Landscape development and boundary influences in the Canadian prairies
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Landscape development and boundary influences in the Canadian prairies

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Published by Dept. of Geography, University of Regina in Regina, Sask., Canada .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Prairie Provinces.

Subjects:

  • Landforms -- Prairie Provinces.,
  • Physical geography -- Prairie Provinces.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies.

Statementedited by John E. Welsted and John C. Everitt.
SeriesRegina geographical studies ;, no. 4
ContributionsWelsted, John E., Everitt, John C.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGB428.5.C2 L36 1984
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 92 p. :
Number of Pages92
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2306182M
ISBN 100919335039
LC Control Number86181954

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Canada is a country in the northern part of North ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering million square kilometres ( million square miles), making it the world's second-largest country by total southern border with the United States, stretching 8, kilometres (5, mi), is the Capital: Ottawa, 45°24′N 75°40′W / . The Canadian Prairies is a vast region with a cool and gene rally dry climate, strongly influenced by the mountains on the west and the northern latitude. Regular variation in c limate influences.   Landscape effects on arthropods are well studied elsewhere, but no equivalent studies have been published for the Canadian Prairies. Crop rotation varies landscape composition annually, changes host plant resources in fields, and interacts with other agricultural inputs to disturb pest and beneficial by: 3. Canadian and foreign travelers spend billions of dollars each year on transportation, accommodations, food, recreation, and entertainment as they travel in the country. The Canadian economy has always relied heavily on trade. Canada’s economic development historically depended on the export of raw materials, especially fish, fur, grain, and.

Hydroclimatic influences and physiographic controls on phosphorus dynamics in prairie pothole wetlands Article in Science of The Total Environment .   The Canadian Prairies (usually referred to as simply the Prairies in Canada) is a region in Western includes the Canadian portion of the Great Plains and the Prairie Provinces, namely Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. [2] These provinces are partially covered by grasslands, plains, and lowlands, mostly in the southern northernmost .   Saskatchewan is part of the Prairie region and is the only province with entirely artificial boundaries. It is bordered by the US to the south, the Northwest Territories to the north, and Manitoba and Alberta to the east and west respectively. It was created from the Northwest Territories in , at the same time as Alberta, and shares with that province the distinction of . Despite Canada’s great size, it is one of the world’s most sparsely populated countries. This fact, coupled with the grandeur of the landscape, has been central to the sense of Canadian national identity, as expressed by the Dublin-born writer Anna Brownell Jameson, who explored central Ontario in and remarked exultantly on “the seemingly interminable line of trees before .

Manitoba (/ ˌ m æ n ɪ ˈ t oʊ b ə / ()) is a province at the longitudinal centre of is often considered one of the three prairie provinces (with Alberta and Saskatchewan) and is Canada's fifth-most populous province with its estimated million people. Manitoba covers , square kilometres (, sq mi) with a widely varied landscape, stretching from the northern Area rank: Ranked 8th. (1) John Welsted and John Everitt, eds. Landscape Develop-ment and Boundary Influences in the Canadian Prairies. Regina Geographical Studies, No. 4, , (Regina: Department of Geography, University of Regina). (2) Kenneth Coates, William Morrison and John Everitt. Canada is a country, consisting of ten provinces and three territories, in the northern part of the continent of North extends from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering million square kilometres ( million square miles) in total, making it the world's second-largest country by total area and the fourth-largest country by land area. The southern boundary of the new park lies about thirty-three miles north by west of the city of Prince Albert. Its western boundary is formed in part by the Sturgeon river, its eastern by the Third Meridian. At about the 54th parallel, however, the park limits swing eastward, so as to touch but not include the waters of Montreal lake.